Five lessons Sensory Intelligence® taught me

Posted: 20 May, 2016

By: Annemarie Lombard

Section: Relationships, Wellness

5 Tips SIQ has taught me

When I reflect on my sensory intelligence journey which started in 2002, I have learned so much, and would like to share that with you.  The following 5 lessons stand out for me as it contributed to our vision and mission in sensory intelligence:

1. People are complex, yet so different and unique.  If we can get beyond the fact that the world does not look, sound, smell, feel and taste the same to all people, we stop judging, acquire real compassion for others and accept people for who they are.  Perceptions are a combination of how your brain works, your memories and experiences and different for all of us.  And that is OK, thank goodness we are not all the same.  Sensory intelligence explores, manages and supports individual differences and diversity.

2. People at large are disengaged from the world.  We are living in an era with more change and fast pace than ever before in history.   Technology is overtaking humanity and we literally and figuratively do not stop and smell the roses anymore.  This contributes to many health, relationships and workplace issues.  Stress and depression are at an all-time high! Sensory intelligence goes back to basics in reconnecting with our fundamental brain-body connections to be more present and engaged.

3. Intelligence is overrated:  IQ luckily is not the yardstick for success anymore – it surely helps and contributes, but it is the other intelligences (Emotional intelligence, Sensory IQ, Social IQ, etc.)  which ensure individuals to be successful, balanced and resilient.  Skills and competencies do not guarantee success, the key is to have good relationships skills and apply yourself in a group setting.  My personal favourite of the sensory intelligence process is the relationship component – it is a powerful way to understand yourself and others in families, workgroups and social groups.

4. We all need to dream, have goals and a vision, but at the same time be prepared to be thrown off course.  The key is to go with the flow, be resilient and adapt, but don’t give up on your dreams, never mind how big or small they are.

5. Mediocrity is an unnecessary evil – be passionate, make a difference!  Live sensationally!